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that hama hamas is defensible response but for the crisis and could end the conflict by stop bombarding israel was hard. does he agree with me that the use of long range imported missiles by hamas capable of striking jerusalem has made this much were difficult to achieve? >> yes, absolutely. it is clear that the armory of rockets in gaza has changed since the time of operation, and although there is a longer range rockets, we seen them launch at tel aviv and at least in one case at jerusalem. of course that is an escalation of the threat to israel. but it only underlines the importance of taking forward all the work on a negotiated piece and settlement in the middle east so which has been supported across the house. >> in august this year in a report that gaza would be unlivable by 2020, 44% of posting in gaza -- [inaudible] what conversation has he had with counterparts recently on increasing basic humanitarian coming into gaza and that continues to increase? >> this is a constant part of discussions with israeli leaders. of course, we put the case for that, and, indeed, more than that
of diplomatic ties to iran. there has been no drastic change in egypt's policy towards the hamas government in gaza, or the border regime between the sinai and the gaza strip. there is a recognition, i think, on the part of the government, of the need to leverage the network of relationships and alliances that egypt has formed over the last three decades to deal with what is a very difficult economic situation, domestically. and i will talk about that a little bit further on. so we see on the level of foreign policy much more consistency and much more durability and any sense of radical change, as was the expectation following the outbreak of the revolution. now, that does not mean that there will be no change. i think what you do see on the part of the new government is a clear determination to reassert egypt's regional role that would seem to have been diminished under the former regime. we have seen a much more activist foreign policy on the part of this president with numerous visits to china, reaching out to europe, a visit to iran in the context of the non-aligned movement in reaching
that may have no the only with regard to hamas but whole area around him and if he thinks about making compromise, what he sees is the high likelihood this is going to produce a backlash. he gives a, he gives an interview with channel 2 in israel where he speaks that he is personally not going back to -- and see him burning in effigy and demonstrations against him in gas salt he can assume what the consequences are if in fact he takes these kind of steps. so it had a chilling effect on him. also given what you see with the arab awakening it made him perhaps not for surprising reasons act more as a populist. on the flipside within israel. same thing. you're going to do a deal with abu mazen. is it going to be durable? you know, what are you going to face right after it? this is a time where rather thinking about taking big leaps forward there is tendency to sort of think about what are the risks and not what are the opportunities. i would say it's understandable that both side have that view but i would also say something else. you know, the status quo won't remain at that time tick. de
was killed -- a hamas leader was killed, and the perpetrators were seen. how do you, how do you go off the grid now as a spy? how can you go through? [laughter] just asking for a little trade craft. is that so wrong? >> again, i would underscore the discipline. trade craft is mostly about discipline and paying attention to detail. whether it's a disguise or whether it's the cover story. increasingly, your partners. we tend to think of the spy as this unilateral, solo hero, and there's still some of that, there always will be. but with a growing interdependence and talk about risk, it's increasingly about building alliances and partnerships, trusted partnerships where you can work with other services and other entities around the world. and that's overall a good thing. >> well, you were called by director john mclaughlin a genuine american hero. he is not a man who's given light ri to that kind of -- lightly to that kind of thing, so we thank you for joining us as an american hero and appreciate it. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] >> and we have more from the ideas forum now as lead
is because the israeli defense forces are infinitely more professional than the hamas fighters. the number of casualties on the palestinian side are always going to be much greater thereby leaving an impression that there is somehow something unfolded about the war. this is precisely the time when you need the correspondence that have spent the years in the region because by and large you ask me what i think of the coverage i think it's surfaced. it focuses on the obvious. you don't hear much about the underlying causes or with the underlining possiblities made before the agreement between the two sides. i think that is one of the things that we have lost not having resident correspondents who report year after year after year. >> it's interesting just an additional point that a couple of nights ago abc world news tonight happened to be there doing another story when the story erupted and the anchor diane sawyer turned to her with a big introduction to we have her there she is going to give the inside story but then they gave her about 45 seconds to do the inside story, and you could see h
at what happened recently in the conflict from hamas, the missiles that were being shot into israel, and the system to understand the importance of missile defense. that is a system that focuses on short-term -- short-range missiles, but we all saw the number of civilians that could be protected by the capacity of having a robust missile defense system, and i can't imagine why we wouldn't want to be in the position to make sure that the east coast of our country would be as protected as the west coast when it comes to an emerging threat from iran. and there's no question that the more we hear about the behavior of iran, the more troubled we should be as a country, not only are they -- do they have a robust missile development program, but we all know that they are also making efforts to acquire the capability of having a nuclear weapon. and so now is the time for us to act, not to find ourselves in 2015 with no plans as to how to deploy an east coast missile defense site to make sure that the east coast of our country has the same protection as the west coast, and now is the time to
is not easy, that you have palestinian interlocketters. you have, but it's not a done deal because of hamas and things like that, but my hope is that a speech like that would change the political balance within israel. it would make israelis realize that we're going off in a bad direction here. >> can i invite questions from the audience? we have mike here who would like, for the sake of the tv and recordings, to go to the microphone. yeah, i would like the questions from the microphone so it can be picked up, yes. >> my name is paul gallager with eia news service. i want to talk about controlling the war policy and the drone policy of the current obama administration, which completelyignores the congress and the war powers act and the constitution. leaving aside what romney's might do which is bringing about a kind of 9/11 take 2 remitted by the calamity in benghazi and the possibility now of a retaliation, a bombing retaliation to the calamity. al-qaeda is not being defeated by the strategy, but ratter the opposite. the saudis are in the middle of the 9/11 take 2, support from london is i
for hezbollah and hamas and turn it into only political support. unfortunately, that turned into only pursuit. but these two examples are indications that with the right kind of pressures, their behavior will change. now, as you said, p.j., there's no doubt we have succeeded in putting on them crippling sanctions. in 2009 we talked about biting sanctions because we had to change the dynamic. we've gotten to the point where we're able to work with the rest of the world and mobilize the rest of the world to put crippling sanctions on them, and the estimates right now are every two months their currency is being devalued by half. every two months. think about what that means. it means whatever they're buying costs them twice at much, it means whatever they have in the bank is valued at half as much. the manifestations of the effect this is having within society are not hard to come by. you had demonstrations during the most recent ramadan because there was a shortage of chicken. not typical to have demonstrations during ramadan. three weeks ago you had gone straights in the bazaar, again by the
forces are infinitely more professional than hamas fighters, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are always going to be much greater, thereby leaving an impression that there is somehow something unfair about the war. this is precisely a time when you need the correspondents have spent years in the region, because by and large, you ask me what i think of the coverage, i think it's surface. it focuses on the obvious, the casualties. you don't hear much about the underlying causes or what the underlying possibilities may be for agreement between the two sides. i think that's one of the things we have lost in not having resident correspondents who report from a region year after year after year. >> is interesting, just an additional point, ted, a couple of nights ago abc "world news tonight" had -- happened to be there doing another story when the gaza story erupted. and anchor diane sawyer turned to her, with a big intro, that we have chris there and she will give us the inside story. at then they it for about 45 seconds. to do the inside story. and she was, you could see. she
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9